The Best Apple Cider Vinegar Hair Rinse – Benefits & Recipe

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Read more here: http://www.naturalapplecidervinegar.com/amazing-remedies-that-doctors-hate-about-apple-cider-vinegar/

Find Bragg’s Organic Natural Apple Cider Vinegar on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2cxh2zH

Most store brand shampoos and soap strip hair of natural oils, causing your hair to be dry and brittle. A great solution to avoiding damage caused by harsh soaps is to use apple cider vinegar for washing hair. There are many great benefits to apple cider vinegar for use in your home, diet, and even personal care.

Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits on Hair
More Balanced Hair & Scalp pH

As already stated, many commercial hair care products have harmful effects on hair, often leaving it dry and brittle. The ideal pH level for our hair around 4 to 5. The acidic properties in apple cider vinegar help maintain a healthy pH balance of your hair. It also helps remove buildup in the hair without stripping the hair of its natural, healthy oils.

Natural Detangler

Most people who struggle with tangled hair often use commercial conditioners. Apple cider vinegar naturally detangles hair. This is especially helpful for ladies with natural hair. Simply rinse with a diluted apple cider vinegar solution after shampooing and conditioning. Blot your hair dry and comb from end to root. You’ll notice how much easier it is to comb without pain.

Natural Treatment for Dandruff, Itchy, or Dry Scalp

The natural antibacterial and anti-fungal properties of apple cider vinegar help treat dry, itchy scalps. You can get detailed information in my post on how to use apple cider vinegar to get rid of dandruff. The acidity of the apple cider vinegar will help maintain proper pH balance of your scalp. By restoring the natural pH level of your scalp, your scalp will no longer be an ideal environment for fungus, bacteria or yeast that often causes dandruff.

Enhanced Hair Growth

Since apple cider vinegar is a great for antibacterial, it can treat clogged hair follicles due to bacterial infection. This type of infection creates crusty flakes on the scalp, usually resulting in hair loss. Apple cider vinegar stimulates circulation to the hair follicles, thus strengthening the hair roots and promoting healthy hair growth.

How to Make an Apple Cider Vinegar Hair Rinse

You can’t buy just any apple cider vinegar for this to work properly. You need to choose raw, organic, unfiltered, and unpasteurized apple cider vinegar. The best brand for this is Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar. Bragg is also organic and contains the “mother of vinegar”, which contains beneficial enzymes, bacteria, pectin and trace minerals. Shake the bottle each time before using apple cider vinegar to distribute the elements.

Apple Cider Vinegar Hair Rinse

1 cup water
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

In a spray bottle mix water and apple cider vinegar using the same ratio of ingredients if you prepare a larger quantity.

You will need to experiment a little to see what works best for your hair. Higher concentrations of apple cider vinegar is better for oily hair. Start from the lower dilution and experiment by adding more or less apple cider vinegar to determine what works best for your hair type.

Apply apple cider vinegar rinse after shampooing and massage it into your hair and scalp. Let sit for a couple of minutes. Finally, rinse your hair thoroughly. This is a natural detangler, so you do not need to use conditioner.

Be careful not to get the rinse into your eyes as it will sting. As your hair is drying, you may smell the vinegar, however, once your hair is dry, the smell is gone.

Do this treatment once or twice a week. (Sponsored)

Comments

Beth Bookout says:

So I have a question about this and the solution I should use. You said with oily hair use more ACV and dry hair less ACV. But I have dry course hair that now my scalp has started flaking since the weather has changed and I am also trying to grown my hair out and heal damage that was done to my hair. Should I still use a lesser amount of ACV?

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